Jewish Spurs fans celebrate return of football by continuing to racially abuse themselves

By, Jonathan Korn, Editor

The Premier League is back, and better than ever! Well, I say better than ever; fans can’t go to games, or meet up to watch them, the atmosphere is flat, and the quality of football sub-standard. Even more distressingly though, Tottenham fans are no longer able to hurl anti-Semitic insults at themselves and their team for 90 minutes each week. 

Before the lockdown, one could rely on 60,000+ Tottenham supporters shouting “Yid Army” at the top of their lungs, secure in the knowledge that whilst “Yid” is a derogatory name for a Jew, as long as they (by which I mean lots of non-Jewish fans) sung it about themselves (a club with no Jewish players), no one could possibly construe it as an anti-Semitic statement. Except the Community Security Trust, the Jewish Leadership Council, and Action Against Discrimination, of course, who all viewed it in exactly that way.

However, the return of football behind closed doors means disappointment for those who looked forward to a return to normality, normality in this case being anti-Semitic chanting from the terraces. Already, Sky Sports have been criticised for refusing to switch their “Crowd filter” setting to “Constant racist abuse”

More zealous fans have come up with ingenious ways to continue the uplifting racial abuse from the comfort of their own homes. Already, reports have emerged of friends meeting over Zoom to chant about the return of “The Yids”, although it later emerged that one meeting organised on this pretext was actually an online EDL rally attended by several prominent Holocaust deniers.

Meanwhile, far-left newspaper The Canary has criticised the term “Yid Army”, on the grounds that “We should all be striving for peace, and armies are at odds with that GOALLLLL”. Editor Chris Williamson confirmed to our magazine later that this, rather than the term “Yid”, was the part of the chant he truly objected to.

Featured Image: Unsplash/Connor Coyne

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